Cervical Radiculopathy

This condition is an irritation or compression of one or more nerve roots in the cervical spine. Because these nerves travel to the shoulders, arms and hands, an injury in the cervical spine can cause symptoms in these areas. Cervical radiculopathy may result from a variety of problems with the bones and tissues of the cervical spinal column.

Lumbar Radiculopathy

This condition is an irritation or compression of one or more nerve roots in the lumbar spine. Because these nerves travel to the hips, buttocks, legs and feet, an injury in the lumbar spine can cause symptoms in these areas. Sciatica may result from a variety of problems with the bones and tissues of the lumbar spinal column.

Spinal Stenosis

Your spinal nerves travel through your spinal canal and exit through openings we call “foramen.” If any of these spaces are too narrow, your nerves become compressed. We say you have “spinal stenosis.” It’s a problem that most often happens in the neck and lower back.

Osteoarthritis of the Spine

If you have back or neck pain that doesn’t go away, you may have osteoarthritis of the spine. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. For many of us, it develops slowly as we age. And it can keep you from being as active as you like.

Osteoarthritis of the Hip

This type of arthritis, also called “degenerative joint disease,” is a breakdown of the cartilage in your hip joint. As this protective cartilage wears away, bone rubs against bone. Bony growths called “bone spurs” may form in the joint. Pain from osteoarthritis can keep you from being as active as you like.

Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Knee pain may keep you from being as active as you like. And it may come from a gradual breakdown of your knee’s cartilage. That’s a protective tissue on the ends of your bones. In a healthy knee, the bones glide smoothly against each other. But in a knee with osteoarthritis, cartilage begins to wear away. Bone rubs against bone. Bony bumps we call “bone spurs” may form.

Epidural Steroid Injection (ESI) in the Cervical Spine

This injection treats the pain of an inflamed nerve in your cervical spine. It relieves nerve swelling. If you have a herniated disc, spinal stenosis or some other problem that’s pressing on a nerve, it may help you.

Cervical Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection

This injection procedure is performed to relieve neck, shoulder and arm pain related to compression of a nerve root in the cervical spine. Conditions such as herniated discs and spinal stenosis can compress nerves, causing inflammation and pain. The medication injected helps decrease the swelling of nerves.

Medial Branch Block

This is an injection of numbing medicine. It bathes the medial branch nerves, which attach to the facet joints of your spine. These nerves hurt when facet joints are injured or diseased. The injection helps find the source of your pain. And it may relieve your pain for a brief time.

Facet Joint Injections

The facet joints, found on both sides of the back of the spine, can become painfully irritated or inflamed. A facet joint injection may help diagnose the source of a patient’s pain. It can also relieve pain and inflammation.

Thoracic Epidural Steroid Injection

This outpatient procedure is an injection performed to relieve pain in the upper back.

Cervical Facet Radiofrequency Neurotomy (Ablation)

This procedure uses heat from radio waves to treat painful facet joints in your neck. It eases pain that isn’t helped by medications or physical therapy.

Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

This injection procedure is performed to relieve low back and radiating leg pain. Steroid medication can reduce the swelling and inflammation caused by spinal conditions.

Lumbar Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection

This outpatient procedure is an injection of a steroid-anesthetic medication. The medication can reduce swelling and inflammation of irritated spinal nerves. This procedure is performed to relieve pain in the lower back and pain that radiates from the back to the legs. The injection takes only a few minutes to complete.

Radiofrequency Neurotomy (Ablation) of the Lumbar Facets

This procedure uses heat from radio waves to treat painful facet joints in your lower back. It eases pain that isn’t helped by medications or physical therapy.

Caudal Steroid Injection

This outpatient procedure is an injection of a steroid-anesthetic medication through an opening in the sacrum. The medication can reduce swelling and inflammation of irritated spinal nerves. The injection takes only a few minutes to complete.

Sacroiliac (SI) Joint Steroid Injection

This injection procedure is performed to relieve pain caused by arthritis in the sacroiliac joint where the spine and hip bone meet. The steroid medication can reduce swelling and inflammation in the joint.

Trigger Point Injections

This outpatient procedure is designed to reduce or relieve the pain of trigger points. These small, tender knots can form in muscles or in the fascia (the soft, stretchy connective tissue that surrounds muscles and organs). The trigger point injection procedure takes only a few minutes to complete.

Electromyography (EMG)

This is a test of your muscles and nerves. It usually has two parts. One is a nerve conduction study. This measures how well electricity moves through your nerves. The second part is a needle electromyogram. It records the electrical signals your muscles make when you move them. The results can help your doctor find problems linked to certain disorders or conditions.

Genicular Nerve Ablation (RF Neurotomy)

During this outpatient procedure, the physician uses a radiofrequency device to heat up and disrupt the genicular nerves. These are the sensory nerves that transmit pain signals from the knee to the brain. Disrupting these pathways can provide long term relief from knee pain.

Genicular Nerve Block

This outpatient procedure is an injection of anesthetic to the genicular nerves. These are the sensory nerves that transmit pain signals from the knee to the brain. Anesthetizing these nerves can disrupt the pain signals caused by degeneration of the knee. A genicular nerve block can provide temporary pain relief. It may help determine if a patient is a candidate for nerve ablation, which can provide long-term pain relief.

Hip Joint Injection

If you have pain in your hip, your doctor may inject medicine into your hip joint. It can help your doctor find where your pain is coming from. It can also make your hip feel better.

Ultrasound-Guided Injection for Knee Pain

This non-operative, outpatient procedure is designed to provide relief for patients with arthritis of the knee. The technique allows the physician to inject an inflammation-reducing steroid with maximum accuracy.

Ultrasound-Guided Injection for Shoulder Pain

This non-operative, outpatient procedure is designed to provide relief for patients with pain in the shoulder from conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and adhesive capsulitis. The technique allows the physician to inject an inflammation-reducing steroid with maximum accuracy.